No Matter How You Run The Numbers, The Result Remains the Same:

Homebirth, with or without a non-CNM midwife, is more dangerous than giving birth in the hospital.

Keeping in mind that homebirth midwives all claim to work with only low-risk women, lets look at the numbers I posted Friday:

“This Must Be a Joke” rants and raves in the comments of the previous post, calls me biased and stupid, and claims I shouldn’t have used the numbers from 32 weeks on. Other than the insults, she has a point. (I assume she is a she. If not, I apologize profoundly.) So I re-ran the numbers. Several times. Keep in mind that homebirth midwives all claim to work only with low-risk women. If women are having footling breech babies at home, it is only because some CPMs and DEMs lack the education and skill to diagnose the problem ahead of time and are shocked to see feet coming out first down the birth canal.  Or they believe that breech is just a “variation of normal” and low risk enough for birth at home. But I digress. We’ll compare the “other midwife” category (Notice this is midwives who are not CNMs we’re talking about here. There are no women in this category who intended to give birth with their OB at the hospital and somehow ended up giving birth with a midwife in their car on the way instead) with both the hospital numbers that include high risk hospital births — those attended by all hospital caregivers — and those that are only low risk, which are the births attended by CNMs.

Here are the numbers from 37 weeks on:

 hmmm. Looks like homebirth midwives are doing even worse in comparison to the hospital than they were in the 32 weeks-and-beyond numbers. How could that be? Because the 32 week numbers were increasing the hospital death rates! Once the pregnancy approaches term, hospital numbers improve, but it sure looks like the homebirth midwives don’t. Keep in mind, homebirth midwives claim to work only with low-risk women. But wait! These numbers include those babies born before 39 weeks. We all know those are slightly more dangerous than those born after 40 weeks. What happens if you throw out weeks 37 through 39?

 

Even WORSE numbers for homebirth! The homebirth death rate with an other-than-CNM midwife is now virtually TWO TIMES the higher risk hospital numbers, and more than three times the lower-risk CNM numbers. Keep in mind that homebirth midwives claim they work only with low-risk women. But wait, that 42nd week can get dicey! Totally ignoring the fact that most homebirth midwives claim there’s no expiration date on pregnancy, lets just take that out of the numbers. SURELY that must be the problem for homebirth midwives.

 

 

Hmmmm…nope!  While in all three cases above — while their numbers are slightly higher than CNMs working in the hospital — homebirth CNMs have a much more reasonable rate of death than other homebirth midwife death rates, which are yet again twice as high as higher risk hospital rates and more than three times as high as lower risk hospital rates.

Ahhh, but then we have another commentor, NaturalMamaNZ, who takes issue with my numbers. She complains that I have not properly accounted for confounding factors. Fair enough, she could be right. However, a confounding variable in this case would be high risk situations- but it’s quite an anomaly because midwives themselves accept high risk patients — all the while claiming to accept only low risk patients — and create high risk situations (remember, there’s no expiration date on pregnancy…) so there is really no way to seperate that from the data because that would be “cherry picking” good numbers, just like Johnson and Daviss did in NaturalmamaNZ’s favorite study. The data shows what it shows because of the current unregulation of midwifery and the carelessness in their want to accept patients of all levels of risk. Other confounding variables can easily be accounted for by changing the comparison groups to make them more alike. In this case, I changed the search criteria to include the same criteria Johnson and Daviss used – U.S. non-hispanic white neonates of 37 weeks + gestation. I further narrowed the criteria to women between the ages of 25 and 45 attended by the “other midwife” category, in order to remove any higher risk teen moms. I also only included those women with 12 years or more of education, meaning those who are, at a minimum, high school graduates.

 

 

 

WHAT? These numbers are even higher!!! Two times higher than the higher risk hospital births, the ones that include all caregivers, malpresentations, fatal birth defects, and so on,  and MORE THAN THREE times higher than those numbers for the low risk women who deliver with CNMs in the hospital.

But I can hear it now. “This must be a joke” will not stand for the fact that I left women up to age 45 in the group, because we all know they are higher risk. And those numbers include other potential confounders — single mothers, lack of prenatal care, twins, etc., etc. OK. Lets run these numbers, then: non-Hispanic white, singleton, 37 weeks + gestation neonates born to married women ages 25-39 with a minimum 12 years of schooling who started prenatal care before the 7th month of pregnancy. Surely these women — who are the epitome of the woman who hires a homebirth midwife in the US — will have stats that show that homebirth is safe!

 

I’m shocked. SHOCKED. (that’s sarcasm, for those of you who couldn’t tell. By the time I ran these numbers, I had ceased to find any of it shocking. I kept thinking I would be proven wrong with the next set, but alas, it wasn’t the case). These numbers are just as bad. Two times as high for the higher risk hospital births, and three times as high for the lower risk ones.

These numbers are sad. Yes, sad. They represent PREVENTABLE deaths.  Preventable by restricting the kinds of births that homebirth midwives can attend and requiring much higher standards for CPM/DEM education.  Or, better yet, doing away with CPMs and DEMs altogether and requiring a CNM to attend h0mebirths.

(Keep in mind that homebirth midwives claim they work only with low-risk women.)